NYWIFT Blog

Terry’s Picks: Mad Libs, Loving Lily, Sophomore Slump

Mad Libs: Magazine profiles of Hollywood women unfortunately often lack depth. Use The Cut’s exclusive Mad Libs men’s-magazine profile generator, and you too can write a profile of a female celebrity. It’s fun…and frightening.

Loving Lily: Congrats to NYWIFT Muse honoree Lily Tomlin, who will receive the SAG Lifetime Achievement Award at the SAG-AFTRA Awards in January. Vulture recently posited that actresses over 60, like Tomlin, are the new “box office powerhouses” and that Hollywood should take note.

Sophomore Slump: The LA Times had an insightful piece about why making a second film is often harder than making the first – especially for women and minorities.

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nywift New York Women in Film & Television supports women calling the shots in film, television and digital media.

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