NYWIFT Blog

What’s in Your Toolkit: Sini Anderson

By Kathryn O’Kane

Our new column asks our members about their favorite tool, software, article of clothing, shoes on set, favorite scriptwriting software, etc. We caught up with Sini Anderson after her short film screening at the NYWIFT Women Calling the Shots Shorts Showcase at the Hamptons International Film Festival.

 

SINI ANDERSON, Director, Catherine Opie B. 1961

 

What is the one thing you can’t live without in production?

My fanny pack, which holds a whole other world of things that I can’t live without in production.  
 

What do you eat on set/location?

On location, I usually eat coffee but I’ll have a nice bowl of brown rice/greens/tofu before getting there.
 

What do you do to help de-stress?

I walk and listen to music, with every project I do I have a playlist, walking and listening to that music really loudly helps me remember why I’m doing it. 
 

What’s the most out of the ordinary thing in your toolkit?

Haha, sage and crystals. I like to bring my crew together and burn a little sage and connect with them before starting. A few years back I was shadowing Jill Soloway on Transparent and before they started shooting she pulled everyone together and it was very, very similar to what I like to do. I was so relieved! I was like, okay, I’m not the only one. 
 

Sini Anderson (with her dog Cookie) at the talkback after her short film screening at the 2019 Hamptons International Film Festival

 
PUBLISHED BY

busyk

busyk Kathryn O'Kane is a producer/director with over fifteen years of diverse experience in television, advertising and web media. She is honored to serve on the NYWIFT Board of Directors, which supports the careers of women in the Entertainment Industry. Kathryn has crafted narratives as diverse as “Mission Juno,” which documents NASA’s probe to Jupiter, "Master Class," the award-winning10-part flagship series for the Oprah Winfrey Network OWN, and "San Quentin Film School," a six-part documentary series for Discovery Channel following nine prisoners during the first ever film production class in prison. Having started her career supporting democratic initiatives in Latin America, Kathryn has always maintained a love for international travel and politics, and she looks forward to bridging cultural differences through art and story telling. Learn more at www.busyk.com.

View all posts by busyk

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