NYWIFT Blog

Diane Paragas’ Timely Immigration Story “Yellow Rose” Arrives in NYC

This article originally appeared in Honeysuckle Magazine.



By Katie Chambers

In a media landscape dominated by outraged, emotional debates over our nation’s immigration crisis, DACA, ICE, detainment, and children’s immense suffering, writer/director Diane Paragas’ long-in-the-making film Yellow Rose has burst on to the scene. And it could not be more timely.   

The musical film follows 17-year-old Rose (Tony Award nominee Eva Noblezada), an undocumented Filipino girl who dreams of one day leaving her small Texas town to pursue country music. Her world is shattered when her mother is picked up by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Rose is forced to flee the scene, leaving behind the only life she knows, and she embarks on a journey of self-discovery as she searches for a new home in the honky-tonk world of Austin, Texas.

This is the narrative feature film debut for Paragas, an award-winning director, editor, cinematographer and producer of commercials and documentaries, and it has thus far garnered rave reviews and numerous awards, including the New York Women in Film & Television Ravenal Foundation Feature Film Grant, the Cinematografo Originals Grant, and “Best Narrative Feature” Awards at the Bentonville Film Festival, CAAMFest, and the Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival, among others.

In anticipation of the film’s next showing as the opening night film at the 42nd Asian American International Film Festival in New York on July 25th, Paragas took a few minutes to discuss her path.

 

NYWIFT: How did you come up with the story of Yellow Rose? Did your own upbringing influence the story?  

Diane Paragas: I began writing this story over 15 years ago. It’s based on my experiences growing up in Lubbock, Texas as one of the only Filipinos in my school. I played music but not country music. I thought if this character loved everything about Texas and most specifically the music it would be like a grand unrequited love. 

 

 

15 years – wow! Please talk about that process, and what inspired you to keep going.   

When I started the process, I was very naive and worked with a Hollywood writer thinking it would help me get it off the ground sooner. I also was insecure, I think, as a writer. But the first couple of years were tough. There were some opportunities but mostly if I compromised the story. So then I dropped the project for a couple of years, and concentrated on directing, writing other scripts and starting a production company in NYC. After making my first big feature-length documentary Brooklyn Boheme, I returned to Yellow Rose and it’s been a long steady road since.

 

The film is coming out right as media attention on America’s immigration crisis is spiking. What do you hope to add to the conversation around immigration?

Already with the few festival screenings we have had, I can see the profound reactions from our audience. I really believe film has the power to expand our understanding of the world around us, because there are real characters that go through a journey we can relate to. I had a screening with a very conservative predominantly white audience, and they were all so moved. Even a Trump supporter who watched got so moved he said after the screening, “I think Trump should renew DACA.”

 

 

You’ve got an incredible cast. How did Tony Award-winner Lea Salonga and rising star Eva Noblezada get involved in the project? I assume this was before Eva hit it big with Hadestown on Broadway.   

I am so blessed to have the cast we have. I have been a fan of Lea Salonga for as long as I can remember. She in fact was the only Filipino in entertainment I knew about. As for Eva, she was always at the top of my list as potential actresses to play Rose, but she was in the London and then the Broadway company for Miss Saigon. So it didn’t seem an option. But when I saw her in Miss Saigon, I really knew she was the one. I offered her the role right after watching it.  

Eva Noblezada and Dale Watson in Yellow Rose (dir. Diane Paragas)

 

Music is a big part of the film – not only as a key plot point but also as a way for characters to express themselves. How did you use music to move the story forward?

Another blessing in the film was that Dale Watson was so much part of our film. He provided so much of the music and he served as a musical inspiration for the original music we wrote for the film. We wrote a few songs for the short together with Thia Megia (who played Rose in our short) that made their way into the feature. And for the feature more original music was written including music by Eva and myself. I think writing with the characters in mind helped give the authenticity of Rose’s voice. 

 

Congrats on the recognition you’ve received so far! That must be validating after so many years of work on this project, right?

I am so grateful for the recognition we have received through grants and awards the film has won so far. But really the most rewarding thing is reaction from our audiences. The outpouring of love for the film is the ultimate reward from Filipinos from around the world feeling they get to see themselves on the big screen for the first time, to undocumented people coming forward thanking me for telling their story. It is the ultimate reward that people have embraced the film. 

 

What is next for you?

I am working on a lot of other projects including developing scripts for TV and film. But the project I’m in early production for now is a film called the Three Lives of David Wong, which is an experimental hybrid documentary that follows the harrowing journey of Chinese restaurant worker who is wrongfully accused of a murder. We are telling using live-action puppetry as a visual metaphor for the inhumanity of his circumstance. We recently received funding and support from both CAAM [Center for Asian American Media] and Sundance Institute. I’m very excited to finally have the door open to me to continue to tell more underrepresented stories.

 

 

Catch Yellow Rose at the 42nd Asian American International Film Festival in New York City on July 25th.

 

 

PUBLISHED BY

Katie Chambers

Katie Chambers Katie Chambers is the Community Engagement Director at New York Women in Film & Television, and a freelance writer and digital marketing strategist. Follow her on Twitter @KatieGChambers.

View all posts by Katie Chambers

Comments are closed

Related Posts

WIFT Around the World: Postcard from Cannes 2022

NYWIFT Member Panayiota Pagoulatos shares memories from her trip to Cannes 2022 - her first time back on a plane since 2019! She met with WIFTI leaders from all over the world and shared this sage advice: "If you find yourself at an international market or film festival—whether it’s the first or the fiftieth time—look for your people. Whether a business partnership comes out of it or not, staying connected, sharing your experiences, and hopefully learning a thing or two, that’s the pulse that will help keep you going in this tough-as-nails industry."

READ MORE

NYWIFT @ Tribeca: In Conversation with Producer Steffie van Rhee

Cynthia Lowen’s latest documentary "Battleground" offers an eye-opening window into the anti-choice movement, featuring three women from varying walks of life who have dedicated themselves to rendering abortion illegal. Per the Tribeca website: “Told with restraint and balance, director Cynthia Lowen seeks to clarify rather than condemn, and presents a new point of entry for this challenging topic.” While the film itself clearly aligns with progressive pro-choice advocates (who also appear throughout) it offers a fascinating perspective on the sheer systemic power of the anti-abortion movement and the perilous future, felt painfully today, of Roe v. Wade. "Battleground" was Executive Produced by NYWIFT member Ruth Ann Harnisch and co-produced by member Steffie van Rhee, who sat down with us to discuss the premiere and how this film – from this particular perspective – came to fruition.

READ MORE

NYWIFT @ Tribeca: In Conversation with Filmmaker Violet Du Feng

Violet Du Feng’s "Hidden Letters" tells the story of Chinese women trying to balance their lives as independent women in modern China while confronting the traditional identity that defines but also oppresses them. Connected through their love for Nushu—a centuries-old secret text shared amongst women—each of them transforms through a pivotal period of their lives and takes a step closer to becoming the individuals they know they can be. Hot off her 2022 Tribeca Festival premiere, Director Violet Du Feng, an Emmy-award winning documentarian, spoke to us about Nushu, modern-day China, women’s equality, and her filmmaking process.

READ MORE

NYWIFT @ Tribeca: In Conversation with Filmmaker Signe Baumane

Signe Baumane’s "My Love Affair With Marriage" is a brilliant animated film for a decidedly adult audience. It’s a semi-autobiographical musical exploration of love, sex, romance, and gender as viewed through the lens of neurochemistry – not your average animated love story! New York Women in Film & Television was proud to present Baumane with a NYWIFT Ravenal Foundation Feature Film Grant for the film, and even prouder to then see it premiere at the 2022 Tribeca Festival! We sat down with Signe to discuss her wildly inventive, intelligent, and very fun film.

READ MORE
JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER
css.php