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STICKMAN
by Margret Galbraith

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On one of her periodic visits to the Governor's Mansion in Austin, Texas, Susan Nowlin's good friend and sorority sister, Laura Bush, showed Susan a walking stick that was given to her husband, George W. Bush.   The walking stick was crudely carved out of wood, colorfully painted, and etched across it were the Ten Commandments.  Susan learned that a homeless, illiterate African —American artisan named Roosevelt Wilkerson, who lived in her hometown of Dallas, made the primitive walking stick. She decided to contact Roosevelt so that he could fashion a walking stick for the pastor of her church.  Out of this simple contact would blossom not only a business venture, but also a life long friendship.

The documentary, Stickman, tells the story of two extraordinary people, Susan Nowlin and Roosevelt Wilkerson, whose disparate paths unexpectedly crossed and transformed their respective lives forever.  Within the backdrop of the American South, with its history of slavery and segregation, the film shows how the power of the human spirit can overcome the rigid boundaries of social class and race that still pervade the fabric of the American experience.  Revisiting that age-old question: "Is it better to give than to receive?" the film shows that love, compassion, and charity are reciprocal and ultimately benefit all parties involved.

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NYWIFT programs, screenings and events are supported, in part, by grants from New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and New York State Council on the Arts